Andrew Pennebaker | 10 Nov 02:51 2012
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GHC for mobile devices?

I'd love to use Haskell directly for making mobiles apps. How can we make this happen, porting GHC to Android, iOS, and Windows Phone?


--
Cheers,

Andrew Pennebaker
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Kristopher Micinski | 10 Nov 05:46 2012
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Re: GHC for mobile devices?

If you have interest in doing this, I have quite a bit of experience
in Android hacking at the system level and above and would be glad to
talk about what might need to happen.  (Though I don't know the GHC
internals / toolchain so well.)

One potential choice is Scala, though from my limited experience
that's a very rough imitation of the uses for Haskell.  (Though,
obviously it works mostly out of the box because of the JVM compiler
target..)

http://www.haskell.org/haskellwiki/Android

I've been writing up some thoughts on the Android activity lifecycle
already interpreted with respect to FP, apps are quite functional
already for a variety of reasons.

kris

On Fri, Nov 9, 2012 at 8:51 PM, Andrew Pennebaker
<andrew.pennebaker <at> gmail.com> wrote:
> I'd love to use Haskell directly for making mobiles apps. How can we make
> this happen, porting GHC to Android, iOS, and Windows Phone?
>
> --
> Cheers,
>
> Andrew Pennebaker
> www.yellosoft.us
>
> _______________________________________________
> Haskell-Cafe mailing list
> Haskell-Cafe <at> haskell.org
> http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe
>
Andrew Pennebaker | 10 Nov 06:32 2012
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Re: GHC for mobile devices?

Awesome! Jeffrey Scofield has ported OCaml to iOS, so there's also experience there.


On Fri, Nov 9, 2012 at 11:46 PM, Kristopher Micinski <krismicinski <at> gmail.com> wrote:
If you have interest in doing this, I have quite a bit of experience
in Android hacking at the system level and above and would be glad to
talk about what might need to happen.  (Though I don't know the GHC
internals / toolchain so well.)

One potential choice is Scala, though from my limited experience
that's a very rough imitation of the uses for Haskell.  (Though,
obviously it works mostly out of the box because of the JVM compiler
target..)

http://www.haskell.org/haskellwiki/Android

I've been writing up some thoughts on the Android activity lifecycle
already interpreted with respect to FP, apps are quite functional
already for a variety of reasons.

kris

On Fri, Nov 9, 2012 at 8:51 PM, Andrew Pennebaker
<andrew.pennebaker <at> gmail.com> wrote:
> I'd love to use Haskell directly for making mobiles apps. How can we make
> this happen, porting GHC to Android, iOS, and Windows Phone?
>
> --
> Cheers,
>
> Andrew Pennebaker
> www.yellosoft.us
>
> _______________________________________________
> Haskell-Cafe mailing list
> Haskell-Cafe <at> haskell.org
> http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe
>

--
Cheers,

Andrew Pennebaker

_______________________________________________
Haskell-Cafe mailing list
Haskell-Cafe <at> haskell.org
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Mike Ledger | 10 Nov 06:59 2012
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Re: GHC for mobile devices?

I would be so very happy to be able to program Haskell Android programs. I think the steps we'd need are to 1. Port GHC to ARM (done already?) and 2. Create a JVM calling convention for GHC (using JNI? I have no idea). Short of actually making a new calling convention for the JVM, maybe we could use the JNI to create a thin C wrapper that has the code we want to import normally.

Unfortunately I have no idea of where to start and very little experience with Android other than firing up Eclipse, playing around with simple applications and being very dissatisfied.

On Sat, Nov 10, 2012 at 4:32 PM, Andrew Pennebaker <andrew.pennebaker <at> gmail.com> wrote:
Awesome! Jeffrey Scofield has ported OCaml to iOS, so there's also experience there.


On Fri, Nov 9, 2012 at 11:46 PM, Kristopher Micinski <krismicinski <at> gmail.com> wrote:
If you have interest in doing this, I have quite a bit of experience
in Android hacking at the system level and above and would be glad to
talk about what might need to happen.  (Though I don't know the GHC
internals / toolchain so well.)

One potential choice is Scala, though from my limited experience
that's a very rough imitation of the uses for Haskell.  (Though,
obviously it works mostly out of the box because of the JVM compiler
target..)

http://www.haskell.org/haskellwiki/Android

I've been writing up some thoughts on the Android activity lifecycle
already interpreted with respect to FP, apps are quite functional
already for a variety of reasons.

kris

On Fri, Nov 9, 2012 at 8:51 PM, Andrew Pennebaker
<andrew.pennebaker <at> gmail.com> wrote:
> I'd love to use Haskell directly for making mobiles apps. How can we make
> this happen, porting GHC to Android, iOS, and Windows Phone?
>
> --
> Cheers,
>
> Andrew Pennebaker
> www.yellosoft.us
>
> _______________________________________________
> Haskell-Cafe mailing list
> Haskell-Cafe <at> haskell.org
> http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe
>

--
Cheers,

Andrew Pennebaker


_______________________________________________
Haskell-Cafe mailing list
Haskell-Cafe <at> haskell.org
http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe


_______________________________________________
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Haskell-Cafe <at> haskell.org
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Kristopher Micinski | 10 Nov 09:06 2012
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Re: GHC for mobile devices?

Yes, I've seen some of the work done on this and I think he's also
looked into OCaml on Android.

To be completely honest it's not really the language that's such the
barrier: the hard truth is that any Android app doing anything of
interest is necessarily going to be using the Android framework.
Android programming (at least, presubaly iOS too) is not a lot of
advanced construction, it's mostly dumb apps acting as web frontends,
I'd posit that this is probably why people have been mostly content
with the Android API for so long anyway.

So the main barrier is being able to interface with the Java side of
things (obviously) in a way that doesn't completely kill perf either
(this sounds nontrivial...).  Then you need to give a sane
reimplementation of the Android API within Haskell.

kris

On Sat, Nov 10, 2012 at 12:59 AM, Mike Ledger <eleventynine <at> gmail.com> wrote:
> I would be so very happy to be able to program Haskell Android programs. I
> think the steps we'd need are to 1. Port GHC to ARM (done already?) and 2.
> Create a JVM calling convention for GHC (using JNI? I have no idea). Short
> of actually making a new calling convention for the JVM, maybe we could use
> the JNI to create a thin C wrapper that has the code we want to import
> normally.
>
> Unfortunately I have no idea of where to start and very little experience
> with Android other than firing up Eclipse, playing around with simple
> applications and being very dissatisfied.
>
>
> On Sat, Nov 10, 2012 at 4:32 PM, Andrew Pennebaker
> <andrew.pennebaker <at> gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>> Awesome! Jeffrey Scofield has ported OCaml to iOS, so there's also
>> experience there.
>>
>>
>> On Fri, Nov 9, 2012 at 11:46 PM, Kristopher Micinski
>> <krismicinski <at> gmail.com> wrote:
>>>
>>> If you have interest in doing this, I have quite a bit of experience
>>> in Android hacking at the system level and above and would be glad to
>>> talk about what might need to happen.  (Though I don't know the GHC
>>> internals / toolchain so well.)
>>>
>>> One potential choice is Scala, though from my limited experience
>>> that's a very rough imitation of the uses for Haskell.  (Though,
>>> obviously it works mostly out of the box because of the JVM compiler
>>> target..)
>>>
>>> http://www.haskell.org/haskellwiki/Android
>>>
>>> I've been writing up some thoughts on the Android activity lifecycle
>>> already interpreted with respect to FP, apps are quite functional
>>> already for a variety of reasons.
>>>
>>> kris
>>>
>>> On Fri, Nov 9, 2012 at 8:51 PM, Andrew Pennebaker
>>> <andrew.pennebaker <at> gmail.com> wrote:
>>> > I'd love to use Haskell directly for making mobiles apps. How can we
>>> > make
>>> > this happen, porting GHC to Android, iOS, and Windows Phone?
>>> >
>>> > --
>>> > Cheers,
>>> >
>>> > Andrew Pennebaker
>>> > www.yellosoft.us
>>> >
>>> > _______________________________________________
>>> > Haskell-Cafe mailing list
>>> > Haskell-Cafe <at> haskell.org
>>> > http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe
>>> >
>>
>>
>> --
>> Cheers,
>>
>> Andrew Pennebaker
>> www.yellosoft.us
>>
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> Haskell-Cafe mailing list
>> Haskell-Cafe <at> haskell.org
>> http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe
>>
>
Casey Basichis | 10 Nov 15:21 2012
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Re: GHC for mobile devices?

I've been looking for the last two days through every nook and cranny of google to find information about building for iOS.  It seems to be the case that it was once possible to get ios running and now its a bit questionable.  I've tried ghc-ios, ghc-iphone and a few others which are all somewhat out of date.

If anyone has any experience on that platform I would greatly appreciate some guidance in getting it up and running.

As for you notion of "hard truth," and "dumb apps acting as web front ends" its pretty blase to assume that anyone interested in this thread will share that perspective in terms of their own goals on these platforms.  I compose professionally on my phone, its certainly not a toy for my purposes.  I also have no interest whatsoever in getting Cocoa commands into Haskell. I just want a functional way of working with data.

I would greatly prefer to go the Haskell route, but  have been considering OCaml as well as they seem to have an active and enthused interest in iOS.  I would love a bit of perspective on whether OCaml would be worth pursing in the long run for the short term benefit of having a more mature mobile implementation.'

Thanks,
Casey 



>Yes, I've seen some of the work done on this and I think he's also

>looked into OCaml on Android.
>
>To be completely honest it's not really the language that's such the
>barrier: the hard truth is that any Android app doing anything of
>interest is necessarily going to be using the Android framework.
>Android programming (at least, presubaly iOS too) is not a lot of
>advanced construction, it's mostly dumb apps acting as web frontends,
>I'd posit that this is probably why people have been mostly content
>with the Android API for so long anyway.
>
>So the main barrier is being able to interface with the Java side of
>things (obviously) in a way that doesn't completely kill perf either
>(this sounds nontrivial...).  Then you need to give a sane
>reimplementation of the Android API within Haskell.
>
>kris

--
Casey James Basichis
Composer - Cartoon Network
http://www.caseyjamesbasichis.com
caseybasichis <at> gmail.com
310.387.7540
_______________________________________________
Haskell-Cafe mailing list
Haskell-Cafe <at> haskell.org
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Kristopher Micinski | 10 Nov 18:31 2012
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Re: GHC for mobile devices?

On Sat, Nov 10, 2012 at 9:21 AM, Casey Basichis <caseybasichis <at> gmail.com> wrote:
> As for you notion of "hard truth," and "dumb apps acting as web front ends"
> its pretty blase to assume that anyone interested in this thread will share
> that perspective in terms of their own goals on these platforms.  I compose
> professionally on my phone, its certainly not a toy for my purposes.  I also
> have no interest whatsoever in getting Cocoa commands into Haskell. I just
> want a functional way of working with data.
>

I didn't perceive my comment would be taken as insulting by people,
but I apologize if it was!  It is based on quite detailed study of why
people write apps that I've been working on for the past year or so.
The vast majority of apps are thin wrappers around REST services.  I
didn't mean to imply that this is what you would be using it for here,
but rather to give an explanation as to why Haskell may have not shown
up.

I only meant that, at some level, you are going to need to fit into
the platform, you can't deny this: for the case of Android you *have*
to hook into the lifecycle somewhere, because that's how the system
runs your app. You also probably want a GUI (maybe *you* don't, but
I'd wager most people *do*).

In any case, you can get good programming done without much platform
assistance using things like the NDK, some projects manage to do this:
mostly projects with gobs of C++ code ported from desktop to Android
where they need minimal Java sections because of fast production
cycles.

> I would greatly prefer to go the Haskell route, but  have been considering
> OCaml as well as they seem to have an active and enthused interest in iOS.
> I would love a bit of perspective on whether OCaml would be worth pursing in
> the long run for the short term benefit of having a more mature mobile
> implementation.'
>

What do you want to do with it?  From what I can tell about all the
OCaml projects I've seen, they still mostly suffer from the problems
of having a limited interface to the Android system proper.

(I'm not saying that makes them bad, just harder to use to write real apps..)

kris
Casey Basichis | 10 Nov 21:50 2012
Picon

Re: GHC for mobile devices?

Hi Kris,


No offense taken, it was an argument that works to shut down constructive discussion of how to get Haskell running on mobile, a task which has perplexed me for several long days.  I agree most apps are pretty terrible, at least on iOS though, despite the percentages being wildly off there are still a few hundred apps that are very well done and thoughtful, none of them using Haskell I'm sure.

I'm looking to pass Haskell lists of musical data and return processed musical ideas from it (not audio, not realtime).  I was also planning on handling a database within Haskell as the information contained would be used by the music processing and from what I have read Haskell interfaces to SQL far more readily than with a C++ orm type solution.  I was planning on working with Haskells Euterpea as base to build my ideas off of, my I might end up rolling my own similar library as my aims are a bit different than theirs.

Everything else would be C++, including the interface, audio and dsp processing etc.   I already have the C++ stuff running on my phone.  I have read about the difficulty of getting Haskell working in real world scenarios, but as far as I understand my plans for it are fairly well suited to it.

Since much of the documentation online about Haskell seems to be out of date, its tough to get a general feel for whats working.  I see people mention that cross-compilation was finished a while back which should allow for targeting arm but nothing concrete and the website gives conflicting info.  I've also considered using GHC to generate C to paste into the project but it seems there have been and may be more integrated ways to get it running.

casey


On Sat, Nov 10, 2012 at 9:31 AM, Kristopher Micinski <krismicinski <at> gmail.com> wrote:
On Sat, Nov 10, 2012 at 9:21 AM, Casey Basichis <caseybasichis <at> gmail.com> wrote:
> As for you notion of "hard truth," and "dumb apps acting as web front ends"
> its pretty blase to assume that anyone interested in this thread will share
> that perspective in terms of their own goals on these platforms.  I compose
> professionally on my phone, its certainly not a toy for my purposes.  I also
> have no interest whatsoever in getting Cocoa commands into Haskell. I just
> want a functional way of working with data.
>

I didn't perceive my comment would be taken as insulting by people,
but I apologize if it was!  It is based on quite detailed study of why
people write apps that I've been working on for the past year or so.
The vast majority of apps are thin wrappers around REST services.  I
didn't mean to imply that this is what you would be using it for here,
but rather to give an explanation as to why Haskell may have not shown
up.

I only meant that, at some level, you are going to need to fit into
the platform, you can't deny this: for the case of Android you *have*
to hook into the lifecycle somewhere, because that's how the system
runs your app. You also probably want a GUI (maybe *you* don't, but
I'd wager most people *do*).

In any case, you can get good programming done without much platform
assistance using things like the NDK, some projects manage to do this:
mostly projects with gobs of C++ code ported from desktop to Android
where they need minimal Java sections because of fast production
cycles.

> I would greatly prefer to go the Haskell route, but  have been considering
> OCaml as well as they seem to have an active and enthused interest in iOS.
> I would love a bit of perspective on whether OCaml would be worth pursing in
> the long run for the short term benefit of having a more mature mobile
> implementation.'
>

What do you want to do with it?  From what I can tell about all the
OCaml projects I've seen, they still mostly suffer from the problems
of having a limited interface to the Android system proper.

(I'm not saying that makes them bad, just harder to use to write real apps..)

kris



--
Casey James Basichis
Composer - Cartoon Network
http://www.caseyjamesbasichis.com
caseybasichis <at> gmail.com
310.387.7540
_______________________________________________
Haskell-Cafe mailing list
Haskell-Cafe <at> haskell.org
http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe
Kristopher Micinski | 10 Nov 23:49 2012
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Re: GHC for mobile devices?

On Sat, Nov 10, 2012 at 3:50 PM, Casey Basichis <caseybasichis <at> gmail.com> wrote:
> Hi Kris,
>
> No offense taken, it was an argument that works to shut down constructive
> discussion of how to get Haskell running on mobile, a task which has
> perplexed me for several long days.  I agree most apps are pretty terrible,
> at least on iOS though, despite the percentages being wildly off there are
> still a few hundred apps that are very well done and thoughtful, none of
> them using Haskell I'm sure.
>

Yup!  Most of the time apps are merely "translated" versions of rails
frontends.  (For better or for worse, I assume that if we were to port
haskell to work with Android really it would be mostly to appease my
purity.)

> I'm looking to pass Haskell lists of musical data and return processed
> musical ideas from it (not audio, not realtime).  I was also planning on
> handling a database within Haskell as the information contained would be
> used by the music processing and from what I have read Haskell interfaces to
> SQL far more readily than with a C++ orm type solution.  I was planning on
> working with Haskells Euterpea as base to build my ideas off of, my I might
> end up rolling my own similar library as my aims are a bit different than
> theirs.
>

I'm not sure I understand completely, but I agree this isn't a bad idea.

> Everything else would be C++, including the interface, audio and dsp
> processing etc.   I already have the C++ stuff running on my phone.  I have
> read about the difficulty of getting Haskell working in real world
> scenarios, but as far as I understand my plans for it are fairly well suited
> to it.
>

I don't disagree!

> Since much of the documentation online about Haskell seems to be out of
> date, its tough to get a general feel for whats working.  I see people
> mention that cross-compilation was finished a while back which should allow
> for targeting arm but nothing concrete and the website gives conflicting
> info.  I've also considered using GHC to generate C to paste into the
> project but it seems there have been and may be more integrated ways to get
> it running.

I am venturing into my embarrassing lack of knowledge about GHC
internals here, but how easily would the run time system work on
Android..?  I had assumed a large part of the effort into getting
OCaml to work on iPhone went into the runtime system, no?

If you're (Andrew or anyone) still interested in pursuing this I would
be interested in helping out, I have some Android internals knowledge
and would be glad to lend a hand.

One major thing that seems to be necessary is congealing all the
(mis/outdated)information into the wiki article on haskell.org.

kris
Andrew Pennebaker | 10 Nov 23:59 2012
Picon

Re: GHC for mobile devices?

I've tried porting GHC to Haiku OS, a Unix-like desktop OS, but the state of the GHC build system is fairly confusing. The build scripts contain a Perl script with a bad shebang, and you can't build GHC without already having a working older version.

If someone can point me to the most recent GHC code that doesn't need itself to compile, I can work on a Haiku version as practice. I really want GHC for every possible system.

On Nov 10, 2012 5:49 PM, "Kristopher Micinski" <krismicinski <at> gmail.com> wrote:
On Sat, Nov 10, 2012 at 3:50 PM, Casey Basichis <caseybasichis <at> gmail.com> wrote:
> Hi Kris,
>
> No offense taken, it was an argument that works to shut down constructive
> discussion of how to get Haskell running on mobile, a task which has
> perplexed me for several long days.  I agree most apps are pretty terrible,
> at least on iOS though, despite the percentages being wildly off there are
> still a few hundred apps that are very well done and thoughtful, none of
> them using Haskell I'm sure.
>

Yup!  Most of the time apps are merely "translated" versions of rails
frontends.  (For better or for worse, I assume that if we were to port
haskell to work with Android really it would be mostly to appease my
purity.)

> I'm looking to pass Haskell lists of musical data and return processed
> musical ideas from it (not audio, not realtime).  I was also planning on
> handling a database within Haskell as the information contained would be
> used by the music processing and from what I have read Haskell interfaces to
> SQL far more readily than with a C++ orm type solution.  I was planning on
> working with Haskells Euterpea as base to build my ideas off of, my I might
> end up rolling my own similar library as my aims are a bit different than
> theirs.
>

I'm not sure I understand completely, but I agree this isn't a bad idea.

> Everything else would be C++, including the interface, audio and dsp
> processing etc.   I already have the C++ stuff running on my phone.  I have
> read about the difficulty of getting Haskell working in real world
> scenarios, but as far as I understand my plans for it are fairly well suited
> to it.
>

I don't disagree!

> Since much of the documentation online about Haskell seems to be out of
> date, its tough to get a general feel for whats working.  I see people
> mention that cross-compilation was finished a while back which should allow
> for targeting arm but nothing concrete and the website gives conflicting
> info.  I've also considered using GHC to generate C to paste into the
> project but it seems there have been and may be more integrated ways to get
> it running.

I am venturing into my embarrassing lack of knowledge about GHC
internals here, but how easily would the run time system work on
Android..?  I had assumed a large part of the effort into getting
OCaml to work on iPhone went into the runtime system, no?

If you're (Andrew or anyone) still interested in pursuing this I would
be interested in helping out, I have some Android internals knowledge
and would be glad to lend a hand.

One major thing that seems to be necessary is congealing all the
(mis/outdated)information into the wiki article on haskell.org.

kris
_______________________________________________
Haskell-Cafe mailing list
Haskell-Cafe <at> haskell.org
http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe
Andrew Pennebaker | 11 Nov 03:03 2012
Picon

Re: GHC for mobile devices?

ASM for iOS is possible, so GHC mobile should be possible.

www.shervinemami.info/armAssembly.html#howto

On Nov 10, 2012 5:59 PM, "Andrew Pennebaker" <andrew.pennebaker <at> gmail.com> wrote:

I've tried porting GHC to Haiku OS, a Unix-like desktop OS, but the state of the GHC build system is fairly confusing. The build scripts contain a Perl script with a bad shebang, and you can't build GHC without already having a working older version.

If someone can point me to the most recent GHC code that doesn't need itself to compile, I can work on a Haiku version as practice. I really want GHC for every possible system.

On Nov 10, 2012 5:49 PM, "Kristopher Micinski" <krismicinski <at> gmail.com> wrote:
On Sat, Nov 10, 2012 at 3:50 PM, Casey Basichis <caseybasichis <at> gmail.com> wrote:
> Hi Kris,
>
> No offense taken, it was an argument that works to shut down constructive
> discussion of how to get Haskell running on mobile, a task which has
> perplexed me for several long days.  I agree most apps are pretty terrible,
> at least on iOS though, despite the percentages being wildly off there are
> still a few hundred apps that are very well done and thoughtful, none of
> them using Haskell I'm sure.
>

Yup!  Most of the time apps are merely "translated" versions of rails
frontends.  (For better or for worse, I assume that if we were to port
haskell to work with Android really it would be mostly to appease my
purity.)

> I'm looking to pass Haskell lists of musical data and return processed
> musical ideas from it (not audio, not realtime).  I was also planning on
> handling a database within Haskell as the information contained would be
> used by the music processing and from what I have read Haskell interfaces to
> SQL far more readily than with a C++ orm type solution.  I was planning on
> working with Haskells Euterpea as base to build my ideas off of, my I might
> end up rolling my own similar library as my aims are a bit different than
> theirs.
>

I'm not sure I understand completely, but I agree this isn't a bad idea.

> Everything else would be C++, including the interface, audio and dsp
> processing etc.   I already have the C++ stuff running on my phone.  I have
> read about the difficulty of getting Haskell working in real world
> scenarios, but as far as I understand my plans for it are fairly well suited
> to it.
>

I don't disagree!

> Since much of the documentation online about Haskell seems to be out of
> date, its tough to get a general feel for whats working.  I see people
> mention that cross-compilation was finished a while back which should allow
> for targeting arm but nothing concrete and the website gives conflicting
> info.  I've also considered using GHC to generate C to paste into the
> project but it seems there have been and may be more integrated ways to get
> it running.

I am venturing into my embarrassing lack of knowledge about GHC
internals here, but how easily would the run time system work on
Android..?  I had assumed a large part of the effort into getting
OCaml to work on iPhone went into the runtime system, no?

If you're (Andrew or anyone) still interested in pursuing this I would
be interested in helping out, I have some Android internals knowledge
and would be glad to lend a hand.

One major thing that seems to be necessary is congealing all the
(mis/outdated)information into the wiki article on haskell.org.

kris
_______________________________________________
Haskell-Cafe mailing list
Haskell-Cafe <at> haskell.org
http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe
Kristopher Micinski | 12 Nov 00:31 2012
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Re: GHC for mobile devices?

Yes, and the Android NDK allows you to write arbitrary C code, it's
just a slightly less than pleasant interface with the SDK :-(.

Perhaps it's easier to do this in iOS as it's all objective C rather
than a vm with a runtime system.  Also not sure what the status of
porting the runtime system to ios would be.

kris

On Sat, Nov 10, 2012 at 9:03 PM, Andrew Pennebaker
<andrew.pennebaker <at> gmail.com> wrote:
> ASM for iOS is possible, so GHC mobile should be possible.
>
> www.shervinemami.info/armAssembly.html#howto
>
> On Nov 10, 2012 5:59 PM, "Andrew Pennebaker" <andrew.pennebaker <at> gmail.com>
> wrote:
>>
>> I've tried porting GHC to Haiku OS, a Unix-like desktop OS, but the state
>> of the GHC build system is fairly confusing. The build scripts contain a
>> Perl script with a bad shebang, and you can't build GHC without already
>> having a working older version.
>>
>> If someone can point me to the most recent GHC code that doesn't need
>> itself to compile, I can work on a Haiku version as practice. I really want
>> GHC for every possible system.
>>
>> On Nov 10, 2012 5:49 PM, "Kristopher Micinski" <krismicinski <at> gmail.com>
>> wrote:
>>>
>>> On Sat, Nov 10, 2012 at 3:50 PM, Casey Basichis <caseybasichis <at> gmail.com>
>>> wrote:
>>> > Hi Kris,
>>> >
>>> > No offense taken, it was an argument that works to shut down
>>> > constructive
>>> > discussion of how to get Haskell running on mobile, a task which has
>>> > perplexed me for several long days.  I agree most apps are pretty
>>> > terrible,
>>> > at least on iOS though, despite the percentages being wildly off there
>>> > are
>>> > still a few hundred apps that are very well done and thoughtful, none
>>> > of
>>> > them using Haskell I'm sure.
>>> >
>>>
>>> Yup!  Most of the time apps are merely "translated" versions of rails
>>> frontends.  (For better or for worse, I assume that if we were to port
>>> haskell to work with Android really it would be mostly to appease my
>>> purity.)
>>>
>>> > I'm looking to pass Haskell lists of musical data and return processed
>>> > musical ideas from it (not audio, not realtime).  I was also planning
>>> > on
>>> > handling a database within Haskell as the information contained would
>>> > be
>>> > used by the music processing and from what I have read Haskell
>>> > interfaces to
>>> > SQL far more readily than with a C++ orm type solution.  I was planning
>>> > on
>>> > working with Haskells Euterpea as base to build my ideas off of, my I
>>> > might
>>> > end up rolling my own similar library as my aims are a bit different
>>> > than
>>> > theirs.
>>> >
>>>
>>> I'm not sure I understand completely, but I agree this isn't a bad idea.
>>>
>>> > Everything else would be C++, including the interface, audio and dsp
>>> > processing etc.   I already have the C++ stuff running on my phone.  I
>>> > have
>>> > read about the difficulty of getting Haskell working in real world
>>> > scenarios, but as far as I understand my plans for it are fairly well
>>> > suited
>>> > to it.
>>> >
>>>
>>> I don't disagree!
>>>
>>> > Since much of the documentation online about Haskell seems to be out of
>>> > date, its tough to get a general feel for whats working.  I see people
>>> > mention that cross-compilation was finished a while back which should
>>> > allow
>>> > for targeting arm but nothing concrete and the website gives
>>> > conflicting
>>> > info.  I've also considered using GHC to generate C to paste into the
>>> > project but it seems there have been and may be more integrated ways to
>>> > get
>>> > it running.
>>>
>>> I am venturing into my embarrassing lack of knowledge about GHC
>>> internals here, but how easily would the run time system work on
>>> Android..?  I had assumed a large part of the effort into getting
>>> OCaml to work on iPhone went into the runtime system, no?
>>>
>>> If you're (Andrew or anyone) still interested in pursuing this I would
>>> be interested in helping out, I have some Android internals knowledge
>>> and would be glad to lend a hand.
>>>
>>> One major thing that seems to be necessary is congealing all the
>>> (mis/outdated)information into the wiki article on haskell.org.
>>>
>>> kris
>
>
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Ivan Perez | 12 Nov 10:41 2012
Picon

Re: GHC for mobile devices?


I found [1] a few months ago. It outputs Java bytecode, so it should work on android. Given that Android development in java is very well supported in eclipse, you might want to use haskell/frege only for the internals of your program and keep coding your interface in Java.

[1] http://code.google.com/p/frege/

On 10 November 2012 01:51, Andrew Pennebaker <andrew.pennebaker <at> gmail.com> wrote:
I'd love to use Haskell directly for making mobiles apps. How can we make this happen, porting GHC to Android, iOS, and Windows Phone?

--
Cheers,

Andrew Pennebaker

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Luke Iannini | 12 Nov 12:54 2012
Picon

Re: GHC for mobile devices?

Hi All,

https://github.com/ghc-ios/ghc/wiki explains how to get Stephen
Blackheath's GHC fork for iOS running — it's a bumpy road (cleanups
are underway) but I've got Cloud Haskell, ObjectiveHaskell, LevelDB
and my own libraries running wonderfully on my iPad.

I just updated the wiki with a few tweaks for Mountain Lion and Xcode 4.5.2.

Cheers
Luke

On Mon, Nov 12, 2012 at 1:41 AM, Ivan Perez
<ivanperezdominguez <at> gmail.com> wrote:
>
> I found [1] a few months ago. It outputs Java bytecode, so it should work on
> android. Given that Android development in java is very well supported in
> eclipse, you might want to use haskell/frege only for the internals of your
> program and keep coding your interface in Java.
>
> [1] http://code.google.com/p/frege/
>
> On 10 November 2012 01:51, Andrew Pennebaker <andrew.pennebaker <at> gmail.com>
> wrote:
>>
>> I'd love to use Haskell directly for making mobiles apps. How can we make
>> this happen, porting GHC to Android, iOS, and Windows Phone?
>>
>> --
>> Cheers,
>>
>> Andrew Pennebaker
>> www.yellosoft.us
>>
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>> http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe
>>
>
>
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Gmane