Danny Gratzer | 8 Dec 23:32 2012
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Exploring Programming Language Theory

Hello,
Sorry in advance for the soft question:
Recently I have been studying more about how a lazy functional language is designed and compiled and have been reading Peyton-Jones's book "implementing functional languages: an introduction"

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Danny Gratzer | 8 Dec 23:41 2012
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Re: Exploring Programming Language Theory

Sorry for the multiple posts, last time I try to write any decent length email from my phone...


Anyways, and that was "a tutorial" not "an introduction". I am also reading his "The Implementation of Functional Programming Languages". But in any case, I'm liking these books a lot! It's super interesting and everything but a little out of date. Does anyone know of books that cover a similar subject matter but are more current?

To summarize, books that go from compiling a high level language to lambda calculus and/or the theory behind lambda calculus and similar?

Thank you so much!


On Sat, Dec 8, 2012 at 4:32 PM, Danny Gratzer <danny.gratzer <at> gmail.com> wrote:

Hello,
Sorry in advance for the soft question:
Recently I have been studying more about how a lazy functional language is designed and compiled and have been reading Peyton-Jones's book "implementing functional languages: an introduction"




--
Danny Gratzer
_______________________________________________
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Haskell-Cafe <at> haskell.org
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Kim-Ee Yeoh | 8 Dec 23:58 2012

Re: Exploring Programming Language Theory

SPJ's IFPL is an excellent starting point to learn the innards of Haskell. It allows a well-acculturated individual to grab the base of the trunk and start climbing the branches, which means reading the research papers (SPJ's website, mainly though not exclusively), all the way to the leaves (reading GHC source).


> To summarize, books that go from compiling a high level language to lambda calculus and/or the theory behind lambda calculus and similar?

Other than Haskell? There's a comprehensive bibliography on the reading scheme website, which also has loads of links to theory you might be interested in.

Gotta say though, reading is one thing, but you've got to check your understanding from time to time. Barendregt's "bible" on LC has good exercises.

-- Kim-Ee



On Sun, Dec 9, 2012 at 5:41 AM, Danny Gratzer <danny.gratzer <at> gmail.com> wrote:
Sorry for the multiple posts, last time I try to write any decent length email from my phone...

Anyways, and that was "a tutorial" not "an introduction". I am also reading his "The Implementation of Functional Programming Languages". But in any case, I'm liking these books a lot! It's super interesting and everything but a little out of date. Does anyone know of books that cover a similar subject matter but are more current?

To summarize, books that go from compiling a high level language to lambda calculus and/or the theory behind lambda calculus and similar?

Thank you so much!


On Sat, Dec 8, 2012 at 4:32 PM, Danny Gratzer <danny.gratzer <at> gmail.com> wrote:

Hello,
Sorry in advance for the soft question:
Recently I have been studying more about how a lazy functional language is designed and compiled and have been reading Peyton-Jones's book "implementing functional languages: an introduction"




--
Danny Gratzer

_______________________________________________
Haskell-Cafe mailing list
Haskell-Cafe <at> haskell.org
http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe


_______________________________________________
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Kim-Ee Yeoh | 9 Dec 00:00 2012

Re: Exploring Programming Language Theory

I should add that IFPL has important chapters written by authors other than Simon.


-- Kim-Ee



On Sun, Dec 9, 2012 at 5:58 AM, Kim-Ee Yeoh <ky3 <at> atamo.com> wrote:
SPJ's IFPL is an excellent starting point to learn the innards of Haskell. It allows a well-acculturated individual to grab the base of the trunk and start climbing the branches, which means reading the research papers (SPJ's website, mainly though not exclusively), all the way to the leaves (reading GHC source).

> To summarize, books that go from compiling a high level language to lambda calculus and/or the theory behind lambda calculus and similar?

Other than Haskell? There's a comprehensive bibliography on the reading scheme website, which also has loads of links to theory you might be interested in.

Gotta say though, reading is one thing, but you've got to check your understanding from time to time. Barendregt's "bible" on LC has good exercises.

-- Kim-Ee



On Sun, Dec 9, 2012 at 5:41 AM, Danny Gratzer <danny.gratzer <at> gmail.com> wrote:
Sorry for the multiple posts, last time I try to write any decent length email from my phone...

Anyways, and that was "a tutorial" not "an introduction". I am also reading his "The Implementation of Functional Programming Languages". But in any case, I'm liking these books a lot! It's super interesting and everything but a little out of date. Does anyone know of books that cover a similar subject matter but are more current?

To summarize, books that go from compiling a high level language to lambda calculus and/or the theory behind lambda calculus and similar?

Thank you so much!


On Sat, Dec 8, 2012 at 4:32 PM, Danny Gratzer <danny.gratzer <at> gmail.com> wrote:

Hello,
Sorry in advance for the soft question:
Recently I have been studying more about how a lazy functional language is designed and compiled and have been reading Peyton-Jones's book "implementing functional languages: an introduction"




--
Danny Gratzer

_______________________________________________
Haskell-Cafe mailing list
Haskell-Cafe <at> haskell.org
http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe



_______________________________________________
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http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe
Danny Gratzer | 9 Dec 00:15 2012
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Re: Exploring Programming Language Theory

Yes sorry, I followed the link off of his website so I generalized a little.



On Sat, Dec 8, 2012 at 5:00 PM, Kim-Ee Yeoh <ky3 <at> atamo.com> wrote:
I should add that IFPL has important chapters written by authors other than Simon.

-- Kim-Ee



On Sun, Dec 9, 2012 at 5:58 AM, Kim-Ee Yeoh <ky3 <at> atamo.com> wrote:
SPJ's IFPL is an excellent starting point to learn the innards of Haskell. It allows a well-acculturated individual to grab the base of the trunk and start climbing the branches, which means reading the research papers (SPJ's website, mainly though not exclusively), all the way to the leaves (reading GHC source).

> To summarize, books that go from compiling a high level language to lambda calculus and/or the theory behind lambda calculus and similar?

Other than Haskell? There's a comprehensive bibliography on the reading scheme website, which also has loads of links to theory you might be interested in.

Gotta say though, reading is one thing, but you've got to check your understanding from time to time. Barendregt's "bible" on LC has good exercises.

-- Kim-Ee



On Sun, Dec 9, 2012 at 5:41 AM, Danny Gratzer <danny.gratzer <at> gmail.com> wrote:
Sorry for the multiple posts, last time I try to write any decent length email from my phone...

Anyways, and that was "a tutorial" not "an introduction". I am also reading his "The Implementation of Functional Programming Languages". But in any case, I'm liking these books a lot! It's super interesting and everything but a little out of date. Does anyone know of books that cover a similar subject matter but are more current?

To summarize, books that go from compiling a high level language to lambda calculus and/or the theory behind lambda calculus and similar?

Thank you so much!


On Sat, Dec 8, 2012 at 4:32 PM, Danny Gratzer <danny.gratzer <at> gmail.com> wrote:

Hello,
Sorry in advance for the soft question:
Recently I have been studying more about how a lazy functional language is designed and compiled and have been reading Peyton-Jones's book "implementing functional languages: an introduction"




--
Danny Gratzer

_______________________________________________
Haskell-Cafe mailing list
Haskell-Cafe <at> haskell.org
http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe






--
Danny Gratzer
_______________________________________________
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Haskell-Cafe <at> haskell.org
http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe
Stephen Tetley | 9 Dec 09:03 2012
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Re: Exploring Programming Language Theory

If you want compiling functional languages and can relax the
requirement for "up to date":

Antoni Diller's "Compiling Functional Languages" is good. It is short
enough (<300 pages) that you could reasonably work through it and it
includes the full source of a compiler in the appendix - written in
Pascal so translating it to something else is a sufficient exercise.
It is long out of print, but copies turn up on Amazon - I got it from
Amazon UK for a couple of pounds.

Also Franklyn Turbak and David Gifford's "Design Concepts for
Programming Languages" is very good (and new!) but huge. It is not
quite exhaustive - as a skim reader I wanted the specification /
translation rules for a particular compile step and frustratingly it
was left as an exercise. Otherwise it is a very good presentation - it
uses translation rules (ala the LaTeX Semantic package) rather than
source code throughout, so once you are used to the style it is both
very concise (and precise) and unlikely to go out of date any time
soon.
Johannes Waldmann | 9 Dec 14:43 2012
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Re: Exploring Programming Language Theory

Stephen Tetley <stephen.tetley <at> gmail.com> writes:

> Also Franklyn Turbak and David Gifford's "Design Concepts for
> Programming Languages" is very good (and new!) but huge.

Yes! I like that book very much, and I use it for teaching
semantics and compilation of programming languages.

Semantics - by writing interpreters, in several domains.
The book avoids the "M" word, but of course it is actually
the Identity monad, the State monad, the CPS monad etc.
(I guess it should really be presented via monad transformers, though.)

J.W.
Sebastien Zany | 10 Dec 02:23 2012

Re: Exploring Programming Language Theory

Try http://lambda-the-ultimate.org/node/492



On Sat, Dec 8, 2012 at 2:41 PM, Danny Gratzer <danny.gratzer <at> gmail.com> wrote:
Sorry for the multiple posts, last time I try to write any decent length email from my phone...

Anyways, and that was "a tutorial" not "an introduction". I am also reading his "The Implementation of Functional Programming Languages". But in any case, I'm liking these books a lot! It's super interesting and everything but a little out of date. Does anyone know of books that cover a similar subject matter but are more current?

To summarize, books that go from compiling a high level language to lambda calculus and/or the theory behind lambda calculus and similar?

Thank you so much!


On Sat, Dec 8, 2012 at 4:32 PM, Danny Gratzer <danny.gratzer <at> gmail.com> wrote:

Hello,
Sorry in advance for the soft question:
Recently I have been studying more about how a lazy functional language is designed and compiled and have been reading Peyton-Jones's book "implementing functional languages: an introduction"




--
Danny Gratzer

_______________________________________________
Haskell-Cafe mailing list
Haskell-Cafe <at> haskell.org
http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe


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Haskell-Cafe <at> haskell.org
http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe

Gmane