damodar kulkarni | 24 Aug 06:09 2013
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definition of the term "combinator"

Hello,
The word "combinator" is used several times in the Haskell community. e.g. parser combinator, combinator library etc.

Is it exactly the same term that is used in the "combinatory logic" ?
A combinator is a higher-order function that uses *only function application* and earlier defined combinators to define a result from its arguments. [1]

It seems, the term combinator as in, say, "parser combinator", doesn't have much to do with the "*only function application*" requirement of the "combinatory logic", per se.

If the above observation holds, is the term combinator as used in the Haskell community, properly defined?

In other words:

Where can I find a formal and precise definition of the term "combinator", as a term used by the Haskell community to describe "something"?

Thanks and regards,
-Damodar Kulkarni

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Jason Dagit | 24 Aug 07:27 2013
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Re: definition of the term "combinator"




On Fri, Aug 23, 2013 at 9:09 PM, damodar kulkarni <kdamodar2000 <at> gmail.com> wrote:
Hello,
The word "combinator" is used several times in the Haskell community. e.g. parser combinator, combinator library etc.

Is it exactly the same term that is used in the "combinatory logic" ?
A combinator is a higher-order function that uses *only function application* and earlier defined combinators to define a result from its arguments. [1]

It seems, the term combinator as in, say, "parser combinator", doesn't have much to do with the "*only function application*" requirement of the "combinatory logic", per se.

If the above observation holds, is the term combinator as used in the Haskell community, properly defined?

In other words:

Where can I find a formal and precise definition of the term "combinator", as a term used by the Haskell community to describe "something"?

Good question. I believe this article addresses the points you raise: http://www.haskell.org/haskellwiki/Combinator
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John Wiegley | 24 Aug 07:37 2013

Re: definition of the term "combinator"

>>>>> Jason Dagit <dagitj <at> gmail.com> writes:

>     Where can I find a formal and precise definition of the term
>     "combinator",

A function that uses nothing but its arguments.

>     as a term used by the Haskell community to describe "something"?

I find that Haskellers often use combinator to mean "a function that makes new
functions out of other functions", which it can often do as a pure combinator,
but isn't always a combinator per se.

--

-- 
John Wiegley
FP Complete                         Haskell tools, training and consulting
http://fpcomplete.com               johnw on #haskell/irc.freenode.net
damodar kulkarni | 24 Aug 09:10 2013
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Re: definition of the term "combinator"

Thanks. I found the explanation given at the link quite useful in shedding the confusion I had had.

Thanks and regards,
-Damodar Kulkarni


On Sat, Aug 24, 2013 at 10:57 AM, Jason Dagit <dagitj <at> gmail.com> wrote:



On Fri, Aug 23, 2013 at 9:09 PM, damodar kulkarni <kdamodar2000 <at> gmail.com> wrote:
Hello,
The word "combinator" is used several times in the Haskell community. e.g. parser combinator, combinator library etc.

Is it exactly the same term that is used in the "combinatory logic" ?
A combinator is a higher-order function that uses *only function application* and earlier defined combinators to define a result from its arguments. [1]

It seems, the term combinator as in, say, "parser combinator", doesn't have much to do with the "*only function application*" requirement of the "combinatory logic", per se.

If the above observation holds, is the term combinator as used in the Haskell community, properly defined?

In other words:

Where can I find a formal and precise definition of the term "combinator", as a term used by the Haskell community to describe "something"?

Good question. I believe this article addresses the points you raise: http://www.haskell.org/haskellwiki/Combinator

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Kristopher Micinski | 27 Aug 02:59 2013
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Re: definition of the term "combinator"

I've always stuck to the definition of a closed lambda term (the Y, U, S, K, etc... combinators, for example). The colloquial usage generally implies something like "a higher order function that does something interesting (and possibly DSL-y)."

Kris



On Sat, Aug 24, 2013 at 12:09 AM, damodar kulkarni <kdamodar2000 <at> gmail.com> wrote:
Hello,
The word "combinator" is used several times in the Haskell community. e.g. parser combinator, combinator library etc.

Is it exactly the same term that is used in the "combinatory logic" ?
A combinator is a higher-order function that uses *only function application* and earlier defined combinators to define a result from its arguments. [1]

It seems, the term combinator as in, say, "parser combinator", doesn't have much to do with the "*only function application*" requirement of the "combinatory logic", per se.

If the above observation holds, is the term combinator as used in the Haskell community, properly defined?

In other words:

Where can I find a formal and precise definition of the term "combinator", as a term used by the Haskell community to describe "something"?

Thanks and regards,
-Damodar Kulkarni


_______________________________________________
Haskell-Cafe mailing list
Haskell-Cafe <at> haskell.org
http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe


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Gmane