gyelt | 30 May 08:24 2012
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Waterproofing wash basin

Hi,

I'm currently working on a commision to make a wash basin.
http://ergoarte.ch/arte/blog/index.html

I'd like your advice on how to treat the inside of the basin.

It is a local limestone of mediocre quality. I want to treat it to
protect against water and soap saturating the stone. Also to facilitate
cleaning. 
The stone has a lot of hairline fissures, it's probably a good idea to
close those e.q. with some kind of polymer?

Usually, I polish stone and use wax to give it some weather protection,
but for basin used daily for washing hands, that won't be enough and I
would like to offer the customer a more permanent kind of stone
protection.

Any ideas, experiences?

Gyelt
--

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s yettaw | 30 May 08:29 2012
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Re: Waterproofing wash basin


sound like not a good material to start with. 
there are the acrylic resins, but eventually I think the soap and water will work their way under .
stephen 		 	   		  

John Snyder | 30 May 11:21 2012
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Re: Waterproofing wash basin

Clear epoxy, perhaps? Put on thin and polished when fully cured, it should be pretty much invisible. That's
the must durable thing I can think of. 

- John 
Martin Smith | 30 May 12:02 2012

Re: Waterproofing wash basin

I've been following this and, though I don't have precise experience of this, my gut feeling is that nothing
is going to work over a long period. There are almost certainly going to be tiny holes where water can
penetrate. There is going to be thermal movement. The stone is described as not good quality, so the
surface risks not being sound. Why expend the same amount of time and effort on a bad stone as it would take to
use a good stone? 
gyelt | 30 May 13:08 2012
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Re: Waterproofing wash basin

On Wed, May 30, 2012 at 11:02:08AM +0100, Martin Smith wrote:

> There are almost certainly going to be tiny holes where water
> can penetrate. There is going to be thermal movement. The stone is
> described as not good quality, so the surface risks not being sound.
> Why expend the same amount of time and effort on a bad stone as it
> would take to use a good stone? 

Because it's what the customer wants :-) And because it's a challenge.

Perhaps a bit more explanation:

The customer sees an emotional value in the stone from this location
(Tamina-Valley in Switzerland). I use the local stone often, and did
inform my customer about its (lack of certain) qualities.

As the basin will be used indoors, I'm not to much worried about
thermal movement, but it is a good point that any solution probably will
need some maintanance in the future. It's just that a plain wax would
probable need at least yearly maintanance (or 2-3 times yearly), and I
am looking for options that are easier on my costumer.

As to the stone quality: though there are hairline fractures (showing up
when the stone is drying), is is usually possible to polish it to a
smooth surface without chips breaking away. So I suppose any kind of
coating would start it's life flawlessly.

Gyelt

(Continue reading)

FOSTER,MICHAEL | 30 May 22:05 2012

Re: Waterproofing wash basin

I have used crazy glue to penetrate and seal pores and 
fine cracks but only in a small application.I have no idea 
if it would stand up . I wonder also if some kind of Zypec 
would work. It is a cement waterproofer. They sell a 
concentrate version. It is applied  and kept damp. During 
the curing process crystals form in the pores and fine 
cracks that make it impervious to water. The powder is 
grey but the crystals that form appear white. It may not 
be the right product but something in that family may stay 
up longer.

           Michael

gyelt | 30 May 13:11 2012
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Re: Waterproofing wash basin

On Wed, May 30, 2012 at 05:21:54AM -0400, John Snyder wrote:
> Clear epoxy, perhaps? Put on thin and polished when fully cured, it
> should be pretty much invisible. That's the must durable thing I can
> think of. 

Thanks, that might work. What would you do, when/if the coating has
partially worn out? Paint it over or removing it all and start anew?

Gyelt

John Snyder | 31 May 03:33 2012
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Re: Waterproofing wash basin

On May 30, 2012, at 7:11 AM, gyelt@... wrote:

> Thanks, that might work. What would you do, when/if the coating has
> partially worn out? Paint it over or removing it all and start anew?

I wouldn't think it'd wear out in normal hand-washing-type use. Chip/scratch, though, maybe, from
dropped items or such. In which case I'd think it should patch all right. In event of a full recoat, I'd
likely go with another thin layer. Removing it might be a bit of a challenge. 

Test this before relying on it! It's not something I've tried on a decorative-type item. But I have used the
white stuff to repair busted porcelain in an iron bathtub. Ten years later, no problems.  
Walter S. Arnold | 30 May 13:09 2012

Re: Waterproofing wash basin

At 01:24 AM 5/30/2012, gyelt@... wrote:

>I'd like your advice on how to treat the inside of the basin.

I carved a sink for my shop bathroom about 10 years ago, Indiana 
limestone, treated it with two coats of Miracle 511 Porous Plus 
http://miraclesealants.com/s_porous_plus.html
My intention was to reseal it every three years, however I haven't 
had to do that- water still beads up on the surface of the stone and 
doesn't soak in at all. (a bead of water can sit on the surface for a 
couple hours before evaporating).

I don't know if that brand is available in Europe, but look for 
products aimed at porous stone flooring or food preparation surfaces.

Walter S. Arnold  * walter@...
http://stonecarver.com

 
gyelt | 30 May 13:22 2012
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Re: Waterproofing wash basin

On Wed, May 30, 2012 at 06:09:38AM -0500, Walter S. Arnold wrote:
> At 01:24 AM 5/30/2012, gyelt@... wrote:
> 
> >I'd like your advice on how to treat the inside of the basin.
> 
> I carved a sink for my shop bathroom about 10 years ago, Indiana 
> limestone, treated it with two coats of Miracle 511 Porous Plus 
> http://miraclesealants.com/s_porous_plus.html
> My intention was to reseal it every three years, however I haven't 
> had to do that-

That sounds good! I looked up the link to compare it with European
products, but didn't find any information on what it actually is - only
that it is a dissolved product. (here the producers also don't give a
hint on what their product actually contains - irritating)

Anyway, I can email them for more information.

Gyelt

Walter S. Arnold | 30 May 13:58 2012

Re: Waterproofing wash basin

At 06:22 AM 5/30/2012, gyelt@... wrote:

>That sounds good! I looked up the link to compare it with European
>products, but didn't find any information on what it actually is

On the page link I sent earlier, follow the link for the MSDS 
(Material Safety Data Sheet). On page two you'll find partial info on 
the chemical composition- it is petroleum distillate and acetate 
based. Many products here have switched to water based for ecological 
reasons, and the companies all claim the performance is as good as 
the petroleum or solvent based products, but in my experience that is 
not the case. The water based are only half as good, but the don't 
smell bad upon initial application. (that goes away in a day anyway).

Walter S. Arnold  * walter@...
http://stonecarver.com

 
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Re: Waterproofing wash basin Walter

Hi Walter,
I am back to making vases and I use a product that has a tendency to yellow
over time.  Is your product clear, waterproof, and does it yellow???
Jennifer

 

 
Jennifer Cull
PO Box 504
Penn Valley, CA 95946
(530)913-7626
jennifercull-stonesculpture.com
-------Original Message-------

From: Walter S. Arnold
Date: 5/30/2012 4:10:12 AM
To: stone@...
Subject: [stone] Re: Waterproofing wash basin

At 01:24 AM 5/30/2012, gyelt@... wrote:

>I'd like your advice on how to treat the inside of the basin.

I carved a sink for my shop bathroom about 10 years ago, Indiana
limestone, treated it with two coats of Miracle 511 Porous Plus
http://miraclesealants.com/s_porous_plus.html
My intention was to reseal it every three years, however I haven't
had to do that- water still beads up on the surface of the stone and
doesn't soak in at all. (a bead of water can sit on the surface for a
(Continue reading)

Cooper, Ken | 30 May 14:43 2012
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Re: Waterproofing wash basin

Have a look at some of the akeimi products. Ive had success using the 'anti-stain super' on limestone in wet
areas such as as shower wall and floors. Works well, 3 years on and still repelling.
http://www.akemi.de/en/products/stone-program 

Gmane