Bob Waldrop | 28 Apr 03:34 2012
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Whitewash Bob's Roof Day plus Mapping/data site find story on white roofs impacts

Whitewash Bob’s Roof Day is coming up June 2, 2012, this is a free workshop at my house in OKC, where we will
whitewash my roof.

For info on the benefits of white roofs, see . . . 

http://www.builditsolar.com/Projects/Cooling/WhiteRoofExperiment/WhiteRoof.htm  

For info on the whitewashing of roofs, a very cheap way to get a white roof, see. . .

http://www.theatlanticcities.com/design/2012/04/just-fraction-more-white-roofs-could-have-huge-global-impact/1764/ 

There’s also a thread in the archives of this group from last year.

Anyone in the neighborhood is welcome to stop by.  Let me know you’re coming by email to bwaldrop <at> cox.net
or by signing up with the FB event,  
https://www.facebook.com/events/286135491467827/ .

I am also participating in an experiment that will apply a non-toxic coating after the whitewash has cured. 
The goal is to extend the life of the whitewash from 2-3 years to 8-9 years. 

A full report will be written and posted.

Bob Waldrop, OKC
https://www.facebook.com/prairierosepermaculture

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Ken Morneault | 18 Jul 17:05 2012
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Re: Whitewash Bob's Roof Day plus Mapping/data site find story on white roofs impacts


Hi Bob,

Any feedback on the performance of the whitewash yet?

Regards,

Ken

________________________________
 From: Bob Waldrop <bwaldrop <at> cox.net>
To: ROE2 <runningonempty2 <at> yahoogroups.com>; permaculture <permaculture <at> lists.ibiblio.org> 
Sent: Friday, April 27, 2012 9:34 PM
Subject: [permaculture] Whitewash Bob's Roof Day plus Mapping/data site find story on white roofs impacts

Whitewash Bob’s Roof Day is coming up June 2, 2012, this is a free workshop at my house in OKC, where we will
whitewash my roof.

For info on the benefits of white roofs, see . . . 

http://www.builditsolar.com/Projects/Cooling/WhiteRoofExperiment/WhiteRoof.htm  

For info on the whitewashing of roofs, a very cheap way to get a white roof, see. . .

http://www.theatlanticcities.com/design/2012/04/just-fraction-more-white-roofs-could-have-huge-global-impact/1764/ 

There’s also a thread in the archives of this group from last year.

Anyone in the neighborhood is welcome to stop by.  Let me know you’re coming by email to
bwaldrop <at> cox.net or by signing up with the FB event,  
(Continue reading)

Bob Waldrop | 18 Jul 17:47 2012
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Re: Whitewash Bob's Roof Day plus Mapping/data site find story on white roofs impacts

        We had several last-minute glitches we have not gotten this 
done. The first problems were rain, as we had an unusually wet June. 
Then we had a hard time actually finding hydrated (slaked) lime. None of 
the usual suspects I had access to (Lowes, Home Despot, Ace Hardware) 
stock it anymore.  I have now tracked down some (from a tack shop)  and 
will do a fence and then we will see about doing the roof.  I am doing 
the fence first to try out two or three different formulations for 
whitewash, as there are lots of recipes out there. I am going to try one 
version that is only lime and water, another with some salt added, a 
third with salt added plus letting it sit overnight before using it.  A 
chemist friend says that the effect of the added salt and letting it sit 
is to make it easier to apply, but the cost is some of the whiteness.  
So we will try a fence before we do the whole roof.

Bob Waldrop, OKC

On 7/18/2012 10:05 AM, Ken Morneault wrote:
>
>
> Hi Bob,
>
> Any feedback on the performance of the whitewash yet?
>
> Regards,
>
> Ken
>
>
>
> ________________________________
(Continue reading)

John D'hondt | 19 Jul 01:14 2012
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Re: Whitewash Bob's Roof Day plus Mapping/data site find story on white roofs impacts

Another version might be lime + milk (actually early cottage cheese, milk 
gone sour that is releasing the whey. What you need is caseine) We have 
found this very hard wearing and heavy-rain resistant as lime and water is 
definitely not.
john

>        We had several last-minute glitches we have not gotten this
> done. The first problems were rain, as we had an unusually wet June.
> Then we had a hard time actually finding hydrated (slaked) lime. None of
> the usual suspects I had access to (Lowes, Home Despot, Ace Hardware)
> stock it anymore.  I have now tracked down some (from a tack shop)  and
> will do a fence and then we will see about doing the roof.  I am doing
> the fence first to try out two or three different formulations for
> whitewash, as there are lots of recipes out there. I am going to try one
> version that is only lime and water, another with some salt added, a
> third with salt added plus letting it sit overnight before using it.  A
> chemist friend says that the effect of the added salt and letting it sit
> is to make it easier to apply, but the cost is some of the whiteness.
> So we will try a fence before we do the whole roof.
>
> Bob Waldrop, OKC
>
> On 7/18/2012 10:05 AM, Ken Morneault wrote:
>>
>>
>> Hi Bob,
>>
>> Any feedback on the performance of the whitewash yet?
>>
>> Regards,
(Continue reading)

Bob Waldrop | 19 Jul 03:17 2012
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Re: Whitewash Bob's Roof Day plus Mapping/data site find story on white roofs impacts

This is interesting.  Do we want only the whey, or is the whole soured 
milk workable?  Or should I find some casein powder and add that? Do you 
also add water too, or is it strictly lime plus soured milk?

I appreciate the tip.

Bob Waldrop, OKC

On 7/18/2012 6:14 PM, John D'hondt wrote:
> Another version might be lime + milk (actually early cottage cheese, milk
> gone sour that is releasing the whey. What you need is caseine) We have
> found this very hard wearing and heavy-rain resistant as lime and water is
> definitely not.
> john
>
>>         We had several last-minute glitches we have not gotten this
>> done. The first problems were rain, as we had an unusually wet June.
>> Then we had a hard time actually finding hydrated (slaked) lime. None of
>> the usual suspects I had access to (Lowes, Home Despot, Ace Hardware)
>> stock it anymore.  I have now tracked down some (from a tack shop)  and
>> will do a fence and then we will see about doing the roof.  I am doing
>> the fence first to try out two or three different formulations for
>> whitewash, as there are lots of recipes out there. I am going to try one
>> version that is only lime and water, another with some salt added, a
>> third with salt added plus letting it sit overnight before using it.  A
>> chemist friend says that the effect of the added salt and letting it sit
>> is to make it easier to apply, but the cost is some of the whiteness.
>> So we will try a fence before we do the whole roof.
>>
>> Bob Waldrop, OKC
(Continue reading)

Ben Martin Horst | 19 Jul 21:18 2012
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Re: Whitewash Bob's Roof Day plus Mapping/data site find story on white roofs impacts

I've only mixed and used a milk-based paint once, but then to good effect.
We painted a floor with it, which gets heavy traffic, then sealed it with
an oil and beeswax mix. It's proven very durable, and we're now on year 3.
We used a quark paint recipe out of a book whose title I no longer recall,
but there's a recipe here
http://www.appropedia.org/Curdled_milk_paint_recipe that looks pretty
similar to what we used.

On Wed, Jul 18, 2012 at 6:17 PM, Bob Waldrop <bob@...> wrote:

> This is interesting.  Do we want only the whey, or is the whole soured
> milk workable?  Or should I find some casein powder and add that? Do you
> also add water too, or is it strictly lime plus soured milk?
>
> I appreciate the tip.
>
> Bob Waldrop, OKC
>
> On 7/18/2012 6:14 PM, John D'hondt wrote:
> > Another version might be lime + milk (actually early cottage cheese, milk
> > gone sour that is releasing the whey. What you need is caseine) We have
> > found this very hard wearing and heavy-rain resistant as lime and water
> is
> > definitely not.
> > john
> >
> >>         We had several last-minute glitches we have not gotten this
> >> done. The first problems were rain, as we had an unusually wet June.
> >> Then we had a hard time actually finding hydrated (slaked) lime. None of
> >> the usual suspects I had access to (Lowes, Home Despot, Ace Hardware)
(Continue reading)

Sue Bell | 19 Jul 22:57 2012
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Re: Whitewash Bob's Roof Day plus Mapping/data site find story on white roofs impacts


Does anyone know the possible results of painting casine based paint on top of latex paint?

On Jul 19, 2012, at 2:18 PM, Ben Martin Horst <ben.martinhorst <at> gmail.com> wrote:

> I've only mixed and used a milk-based paint once, but then to good effect.
> We painted a floor with it, which gets heavy traffic, then sealed it with
> an oil and beeswax mix. It's proven very durable, and we're now on year 3.
> We used a quark paint recipe out of a book whose title I no longer recall,
> but there's a recipe here
> http://www.appropedia.org/Curdled_milk_paint_recipe that looks pretty
> similar to what we used.
> 
> On Wed, Jul 18, 2012 at 6:17 PM, Bob Waldrop <bob <at> bobwaldrop.net> wrote:
> 
>> This is interesting.  Do we want only the whey, or is the whole soured
>> milk workable?  Or should I find some casein powder and add that? Do you
>> also add water too, or is it strictly lime plus soured milk?
>> 
>> I appreciate the tip.
>> 
>> Bob Waldrop, OKC
>> 
>> On 7/18/2012 6:14 PM, John D'hondt wrote:
>>> Another version might be lime + milk (actually early cottage cheese, milk
>>> gone sour that is releasing the whey. What you need is caseine) We have
>>> found this very hard wearing and heavy-rain resistant as lime and water
>> is
>>> definitely not.
>>> john
(Continue reading)

John D'hondt | 20 Jul 01:58 2012
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Re: Whitewash Bob's Roof Day plus Mapping/data sitefind story on white roofs impacts

The article below says you can put in top of existing paint layers and those 
would probably be latex. I am inclined to believe that from what I have 
seen.
john

> Does anyone know the possible results of painting casine based paint on 
> top of latex paint?
>
> On Jul 19, 2012, at 2:18 PM, Ben Martin Horst <ben.martinhorst <at> gmail.com> 
> wrote:
>
>> I've only mixed and used a milk-based paint once, but then to good 
>> effect.
>> We painted a floor with it, which gets heavy traffic, then sealed it with
>> an oil and beeswax mix. It's proven very durable, and we're now on year 
>> 3.
>> We used a quark paint recipe out of a book whose title I no longer 
>> recall,
>> but there's a recipe here
>> http://www.appropedia.org/Curdled_milk_paint_recipe that looks pretty
>> similar to what we used.
>>
>> On Wed, Jul 18, 2012 at 6:17 PM, Bob Waldrop <bob <at> bobwaldrop.net> wrote:
>>
>>> This is interesting.  Do we want only the whey, or is the whole soured
>>> milk workable?  Or should I find some casein powder and add that? Do you
>>> also add water too, or is it strictly lime plus soured milk?
>>>
>>> I appreciate the tip.
>>>
(Continue reading)

Bob Waldrop | 20 Jul 05:57 2012
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Re: Whitewash Bob's Roof Day plus Mapping/data site find story on white roofs impacts

Thanks for this, it is always nice to at least have a recipe to look 
at.  My impression is that making whitewash is a little like the way my 
grandmother made biscuits, a couple of handfuls of flour, a skooch of 
baking powder, a dollop of lard, a splash of buttermilk.

Bob Waldrop

On 7/19/2012 2:18 PM, Ben Martin Horst wrote:
> I've only mixed and used a milk-based paint once, but then to good effect.
> We painted a floor with it, which gets heavy traffic, then sealed it with
> an oil and beeswax mix. It's proven very durable, and we're now on year 3.
> We used a quark paint recipe out of a book whose title I no longer recall,
> but there's a recipe here
> http://www.appropedia.org/Curdled_milk_paint_recipe that looks pretty
> similar to what we used.
>
> On Wed, Jul 18, 2012 at 6:17 PM, Bob Waldrop <bob@...> wrote:
>
>> This is interesting.  Do we want only the whey, or is the whole soured
>> milk workable?  Or should I find some casein powder and add that? Do you
>> also add water too, or is it strictly lime plus soured milk?
>>
>> I appreciate the tip.
>>
>> Bob Waldrop, OKC
>>
>> On 7/18/2012 6:14 PM, John D'hondt wrote:
>>> Another version might be lime + milk (actually early cottage cheese, milk
>>> gone sour that is releasing the whey. What you need is caseine) We have
>>> found this very hard wearing and heavy-rain resistant as lime and water
(Continue reading)

John D'hondt | 19 Jul 22:27 2012
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Re: Whitewash Bob's Roof Day plus Mapping/data site find story on white roofs impacts

No, Bob, the whey is surplus for that is where most of the acidity is found. 
And acid and lime are not a good combination. It is not all that critical 
though. Hydrated lime is highly alkaline and able to take a little acid. We 
poor sufficiently sour milk through a cotton pillow casing. That can drip 
for 24 hours or longer and we don't wait that long unless we want to make 
cheese. Soft cottage cheese is about the right consistency. Add at least as 
much volume lime and mix it up then dilute with some water if necessary.

We have found this hard wearing on timber and concrete and we also use it on 
living apple trees where the bark is under attack by bark cancer fungus. 
Even on the growing apple trees it is persistent for at least two years and 
on concrete for at least 6-7 years in our wet climate. Regular white wash 
with just lime and water needs to be replaced every year or sooner here.

I did not invent this. I read about it in some old book ages ago and had to 
try it out. Sorry I can't give you any online references off hand. And I was 
pleased with the results. It is not as white as regular white wash but that 
was no problem for us. And also we have enough milk here to make that not a 
problem. And hydrated lime is still a common building material here.

All the best,
John in Ireland

> This is interesting.  Do we want only the whey, or is the whole soured
> milk workable?  Or should I find some casein powder and add that? Do you
> also add water too, or is it strictly lime plus soured milk?
>
> I appreciate the tip.
>
> Bob Waldrop, OKC
(Continue reading)

Bob Waldrop | 20 Jul 05:59 2012
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Re: Whitewash Bob's Roof Day plus Mapping/data site find story on white roofs impacts

Very much appreciation for these technical details. I bet my grandfather 
knew how to do this but it's on the list of things he didn't teach my 
father who of course was then unable to teach me. My maybe he did teach 
my father but my father decided to just not pass it on.  My father's 
ambition is that I would not be a farmer, so there were lots of things 
he didn't teach me that I wish I knew now.

Bob Waldrop

On 7/19/2012 3:27 PM, John D'hondt wrote:
> No, Bob, the whey is surplus for that is where most of the acidity is found.
> And acid and lime are not a good combination. It is not all that critical
> though. Hydrated lime is highly alkaline and able to take a little acid. We
> poor sufficiently sour milk through a cotton pillow casing. That can drip
> for 24 hours or longer and we don't wait that long unless we want to make
> cheese. Soft cottage cheese is about the right consistency. Add at least as
> much volume lime and mix it up then dilute with some water if necessary.
>
> We have found this hard wearing on timber and concrete and we also use it on
> living apple trees where the bark is under attack by bark cancer fungus.
> Even on the growing apple trees it is persistent for at least two years and
> on concrete for at least 6-7 years in our wet climate. Regular white wash
> with just lime and water needs to be replaced every year or sooner here.
>
> I did not invent this. I read about it in some old book ages ago and had to
> try it out. Sorry I can't give you any online references off hand. And I was
> pleased with the results. It is not as white as regular white wash but that
> was no problem for us. And also we have enough milk here to make that not a
> problem. And hydrated lime is still a common building material here.
>
(Continue reading)

John D'hondt | 21 Jul 00:05 2012
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Re: Whitewash Bob's Roof Day plus Mapping/data site find story on white roofs impacts


Same thing here Bob,
I know that my father and grandfather knew things they never passed on that 
might be usefull to me now.
Then again I also know that not all that old wisdom was wise or usefull. My 
maternal grandmother was convinced that small birds and especially tits 
(insectivores) were responsible for bringing "vermin"/aphids to vegetables 
in summer. I am fairly certain the tits only showed up between vegetables 
because there were aphids there for them to eat. I can not see them 
deliberately importing them.
My mother also did not like small birds so that meme must have been going 
around for some few generations. There are similar things. In the 18th 
century all the great biologists thought that swallows hibernated at the 
bottom of local lakes and ponds and it took over a hundred years to change 
that idea.

But there are a universe of modern ideas that have an army of defenders that 
will be thought idiotic in a hundred years time but that for now stand firm 
even if many people already can see where they fail. I am thinking in the 
first place about the whole chemical industry. It is almost impossible to 
cook up any complex chemical molecule without creating a soup of stereo 
isomers that nothing in nature can effectively deal with.

It is easy to create glucose out of very simple molecules such as methane 
and water in a lab. But only part of what you made will be identical to 
glucose made in plants (D glucose). About half of your product will be the 
mirror immage of L glucose that very few organisms can metabolise.
With enormously more complex molecules you can end up with a soup of a dozen 
or more isomers and I think that is the reason that most pesticides and 
herbicides are so persistent in the environment. It is also the main reason 
(Continue reading)


Gmane