Andrew A. Farke | 3 Aug 15:50 2004
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GSA Abstracts Posted

The hot-off-the-press abstract listing for the 2004 Geological Society of
America meeting has some entries that may be of interest to the list. Full
listings (and additional abstracts--I've only included a small subset here)
are posted at http://gsa.confex.com/gsa/2004AM/finalprogram/

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THE INFLUENCE OF SOCIAL AND POLITICAL CONTEXT IN DINOSAUR PALEONTOLOGY 
FASTOVSKY, David E.

ASSESSING THE IMPACT OF DIAGENESIS ON CARBON ISOTOPE RATIOS OF DINOSAUR
TOOTH ENAMEL: A CASE STUDY FROM THE HELL CREEK FORMATION IN NORTH DAKOTA 
ECHT, Susan and FRICKE, Henry 

USING BURIAL EXPERIMENTS TO UNSCRAMBLE DINOSAUR EGG TAPHONOMY 
SOJA, Constance M.1, SUNDERLIN, David2, and CLOSE, Stephen J.1,

PALEOENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF A MORRISON FORMATION DINOSAUR SITE, BIGHORN
BASIN, WY: CONDUCTING AN INTERDISCIPLINARY FIELD STUDY THROUGH DISCIPLINARY
TASKS 
DEMKO, Timothy M.1, BODENBENDER, Brian E.2, BAAR, Eric E.3, HOLBROOK, Cody
W.4, KUBAREK, Sara J.1, MURPHY, Jennifer5, RAMIREZ, Elisa M.6, SCOTT, Justin
E.7, SWOR, Emily1, and YONOVITZ, Maureen2, 

ESTIMATING ABSOLUTE DIVERSITY: HOW MANY DINOSAUR GENERA WERE THERE? 
WANG, Steve C., DODSON, Peter

A PALYNOLOGIC PALEOENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF A DINOSAUR BONE-BEARING BED
FROM THE CRETACEOUS HELL CREEK FORMATION, MONTANA 
PRESSLER, Rebecca E,

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Tim Williams | 3 Aug 20:50 2004
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RE: GSA Abstracts Posted


Looks like _Seismosaurus_ has been cut down to size, both length-wise and 
taxonomically.  Lucas & co. revise the body length from 52 to 33m, and 
formally sink _Seismosaurus_ as a species of _Diplodocus_ (_D. hallorum_).

>REAPPRAISAL OF SEISMOSAURUS, A LATE JURASSIC SAUROPOD DINOSAUR FROM NEW
>MEXICO.  LUCAS, Spencer G.1, HERNE, Matthew C.2, HECKERT, Andrew B.3, HUNT, 
>Adrian
>P.1, and SULLIVAN, Robert M.4,

The holotype and only known specimen (NMMNH P-3690) of Seismosaurus hallorum 
Gillette is from the Upper Jurassic Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison 
Formation near San Ysidro, New Mexico. It consists of several dorsal 
vertebrae, several cervical and dorsal ribs, an incomplete pelvis, a sacrum, 
and ~ 20 caudal vertebrae including two chevrons. Axial length estimates of 
Seismosaurus of as much as 52 m have been used to identify it as the longest 
dinosaur. However, they are largely based on mistaken placement of the 
middle caudal vertebrae and do not stand up to close critical scrutiny. 
Instead, an axial length estimate of 33 m is well supported. A single 
(right) femur (NMMNH P-25079) found as float at the type locality was 
excluded from the type series but appears to belong to the same individual 
as the holotype. As preserved, this femur is ~1680 mm long, and compares 
well with a reconstructed skeleton based on the axial length estimate used 
here. The supposed 240 gastroliths of Seismosaurus have been revealed to be 
highly polished quartzite pebbles that lack an unambiguous skeletal 
association; they are stream-deposited cobbles of a channel-lag deposit. The 
taxonomic validity of Seismosaurus also is questionable. Many of the 
supposedly diagnostic features of the genus are those of the caudal 
vertebrae that are spurious artifacts of misplacing the middle caudals as 
vertebrae 20-27 although, in fact, they are vertebrae 12-19. This correct 
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Gmane