Conal Tuohy | 2 May 02:33 2012
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Re: zones inside zones?

On 02/05/12 09:39, Dr. Herbert Wender wrote:
In einer eMail vom 1.5.2012 15:42:27 Westeuropäische Sommerzeit schreibt conal.tuohy <at> VERSI.EDU.AU:

What do nested zones mean in the context of a genetic
edition? I looked in the relevant chapter of the guidelines but I'm
actually none the wiser:
http://www.tei-c.org/release/doc/tei-p5-doc/en/html/PH.html#PH-surfzone




As an outsider I surely can't answer your question, but looking at the Whitman example at the cited location I would criticize the imprecision of your subject line: zone is not really nesting in zone but one surface (with its own zones) nests in a zone of another surface.
Indeed! The Guidelines does provide an example of nesting a surface within a zone (representing a piece of paper stuck onto the page), and this nested surface itself contains a zone, which contains a transcription of that piece of paper. But I could find no examples or discussion of zones nesting directly within zones (the subject of Julia's original question), although the schema has been changed to permit this.

-- Conal Tuohy eResearch Business Analyst Victorian eResearch Strategic Initiative +61-466324297
Pierazzo, Elena | 4 May 23:06 2012
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Re: zones inside zones?

I come late to this thread and only after Martin Holmes asked me what I think if it. Thanks Martin to call me back to my duties!

In the Proust prototype I mentioned earlier today[1] I've not used nested zones. Why so? We didn't use them for two reasons: 

1. We used <line>s instead of nested zones as the text was more or less organised in lines, but I would not feel ashamed of using nested zone if it had been otherwise
2. The fact you can plot your zones on a space makes the fact you need nested zones less compelling as you can encode them as siblings and then plot them wherever you need, following your coordinate system.

So, to sum up, while I would not be horrified of a nested zone (the semantic of which is, IMHO, that a nested is a subzone within the main zone, i.e. an area within another area, which for some reasons seems to the editor as belonging to be parent one), if you use coordinates to describe and plot your zones, you are less likely to need them, unless your text is really messy.

Best
Elena

[1] http://research.cch.kcl.ac.uk/proust_prototype/; the xml is downloadable from the 'About' page.  



-------
Dr Elena Pierazzo
Lecturer in Digital Humanities 
Chair of the Teaching Committee
Department of Digital Humanities
King's College London
26-29 Drury Lane
London WC2B 5RL

Phone: 0207-848-1949
Fax: 0207-848-2980
elena.pierazzo <at> kcl.ac.uk
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/ddh


From: Conal Tuohy <conal.tuohy <at> VERSI.EDU.AU>
Reply-To: Conal Tuohy <conal.tuohy <at> VERSI.EDU.AU>
To: "TEI-L <at> listserv.brown.edu" <TEI-L <at> listserv.brown.edu>
Subject: Re: zones inside zones?

On 02/05/12 09:39, Dr. Herbert Wender wrote:
In einer eMail vom 1.5.2012 15:42:27 Westeuropäische Sommerzeit schreibt conal.tuohy <at> VERSI.EDU.AU:

What do nested zones mean in the context of a genetic
edition? I looked in the relevant chapter of the guidelines but I'm
actually none the wiser:
http://www.tei-c.org/release/doc/tei-p5-doc/en/html/PH.html#PH-surfzone




As an outsider I surely can't answer your question, but looking at the Whitman example at the cited location I would criticize the imprecision of your subject line: zone is not really nesting in zone but one surface (with its own zones) nests in a zone of another surface.
Indeed! The Guidelines does provide an example of nesting a surface within a zone (representing a piece of paper stuck onto the page), and this nested surface itself contains a zone, which contains a transcription of that piece of paper. But I could find no examples or discussion of zones nesting directly within zones (the subject of Julia's original question), although the schema has been changed to permit this.

-- Conal Tuohy eResearch Business Analyst Victorian eResearch Strategic Initiative +61-466324297

Gmane